Inclusion and Support Further Information

Support for Learners with Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia and Dyspraxia

What is Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia and Dyspraxia?

Dyslexia is a ‘spectrum condition’ with mild to severe symptoms that affects the way people read and write. People with dyslexia have difficulties with:

  • the ability to identify how words are made up of smaller units of sound (phonological awareness)
  • the ability to remember a sequence of verbal information for a small period for time (verbal memory)
  • the ability to name a series of colours, objects or numbers as fast as possible (rapid serial naming)
  • the speed it takes to process and recognise familiar verbal information such as letters and digits (verbal processing speed)
  • For more information go to: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk

Dysgraphia is a neurological disorder that affects a person’s ability to perform handwriting. Often the person’s handwriting will be poorly formed, difficult to read, a mixture of cursive and block letters, have letters of varying sizes and ‘go against’ convention i.e. written right-to-left rather than left-to-right. However, it is more than ‘messy’ handwriting. Although the person can write, they will find the process of writing more difficult and, in some cases, impossible. Handwriting involves ‘fine motor skills’ which are used in conjunction with the brains ability to process information; a person with dysgraphia will need to use a higher than usual degree of concentration and working memory to complete written tasks. This can be made worse with pressure (such as limited time to complete a task).

For more information go to: http://dysgraphia.org.uk

Dyscalculia is a relatively new and lesser known learning disability that mainly affects a person’s development of mathematical skills and ability to perform calculations.

For more information go to: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/dyslexic/dyscalculia

Dyspraxia is a common disorder that affects a person’s fine and/or gross motor coordination that may also affect their speech. It is a lifelong condition and occurs across the full range of intellectual abilities. How dyspraxia affects a person may change over time, will affect individuals differently and may also change depending on the environment. Issues affecting coordination may affect participation in education, life and work. Indicators could be present in reading and/or writing, activities that require coordination and/or balance, self-care and/or play, among others.

For more information go to: https://www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk

What support can we offer to students?

  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • Modifications
  • In-class support
  • Individual tutorials
  • Drop-in Small Group Workshops
  • Assistive technology
  • Assistive software
  • Exam Access Arrangements
student support

Sensory Impairment

What is Sensory Impairment?

Sensory Impairment is the partial or total loss of one of the recognised 6 senses: hearing; sight; touch; smell; taste; and spatial awareness. Within disability terms sensory impairment primarily makes reference to blindness and visual impairment; deafness and hearing impairment; or dual sensory loss (deafblind) which is a significant combination of both impairments.

For more information on hearing impairments go to: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Hearing-impairment/Pages/Introduction.aspx

For more information on visual impairments go to: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Visual-impairment/Pages/Introduction.aspx

What support can we offer to students?

  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • Communication Support Workers
  • Modifications to resources
  • In-class support
  • Individual tutorials
  • Drop-in Small Group Workshops
  • Assistive technology
  • Assistive software
  • Exam Access Arrangements
  • Risk Assessment

student support at derby college

Autism Spectrum Condition

What is Autism Spectrum Condition?

Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or being “neuro-diverse” refer to a range of conditions that affect how a person interacts with their environments, themselves, activities and others. The 4 areas of difference are social communication, information processing, sensory processing and special interests. As ASC is a spectrum condition it can affect people in a multitude of different ways, making it highly individualised, and also incorporates other conditions such as Asperger’s Syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance. It also has links to co-existing conditions such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Syndrome (ADHD), dyslexia, dyspraxia and medical conditions such as Leaky Gut Syndrome (http://www.leakygut.co.uk/).

For more information go to: http://www.autism.org.uk

What support can we offer to students?

  • Supported transition to college
  • Specific events for learners with ASC
  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • In-class support
  • Individual tutorials
  • Drop-in Small Group Workshops
  • Exam Access Arrangements
student support at derby college

Physical Disabilities and Medical Conditions (Temporary and Lifelong)

What are Physical disabilities and Medical Conditions (Temporary and Lifelong)?

A physical disability is any condition that affects a person’s movement, on a permanent or temporary basis, and/or that requires them to take regular breaks during activities or learning. A physical disability may be obvious but may also be hidden.

A medical condition may also affect movement or a person’s ability to perform every day and/or required tasks to attend and achieve in learning. If medication is required then it is important that you share this with college. Please follow the link on Risk Assessment for further information.

For more information go to: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Disability/Pages/Disabilityhome.aspx

What support can we offer to students?

  • Accessibility
  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • In-class support
  • Exam Access Arrangements
  • Personal care
  • Risk assessment
student support at derby college

Mental Health Problems

What are Mental Health Problems?

Mental health problems (MHP) range from everyday worries to long-term and debilitating conditions. 1 in 4 people will experience a MHP, such as anxiety or depression, at some point in their lives, affecting the way they think, feel and behave. Many people live and function well with MHP, which would be diagnosed by a Doctor, if they get the right support at the right time. Education can be an extremely important part of that support.

For more information go to: http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/help-information/an-introduction-to-mental-health/what-are-mental-health-problems

What support can we offer to students?

  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • Communication Support Workers
  • Modifications to resources
  • In-class support
  • Individual tutorials
  • Drop-in Small Group Workshops
  • Assistive technology
  • Assistive software
  • Exam Access Arrangements
  • Risk Assessment
student support

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

What is ADHD?

ADHD is a condition that affects a person’s ability to hold their attention, control impulses and manage physical movement and activity due to its influence on executive functioning in the brain. These affects can be seen in careless or incomplete work, a lack of attention, fidgeting, verbal outbursts, inappropriate behaviour (for the setting) and in some cases, aggression. ADHD can either mostly affect attention (Attention Deficit Disorder), hyper-activity (Hyper-activity Disorder) or a combination of the 2 (ADHD). ADHD is often treated with medication. If you currently take medication for ADHD or any other condition it is important that you disclose this to a member of staff so that it can be included in your support plan.

For more information go to: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder/Pages/Introduction.aspx

What support do we offer?

  • Person-Centred Support Planning
  • In-class support
  • Individual tutorials
  • Drop-in Small Group Workshops
  • Exam Access Arrangement
student support

Maths and English development

For learners with and without a diagnosed learning difficulty or disability we offer small group workshops on a drop-in basis for numeracy and literacy development. These workshops are facilitated by Inclusion and Support Specialists who aim to meet the needs of the learners who attend by offering bespoke interactive support packages via the college’s forskills suite of software, work sheets, workbooks, games and/or activities. These workshops run on all sites on different days and times of the week – look out for the posters or speak to your English or maths lecturers about when these are.

If you do not have a diagnosed learning difficulty or disability but feel that you require additional support for literacy and/or numeracy development this can be discussed on an individual basis.

student support

What is an Exam Access Arrangement (EAA)?

Access arrangements are pre-exam adjustments made for individual candidates, based on evidence of need and the candidate's normal way of working. They exist to ensure all candidates have the same opportunity to be successful in their exams, and include reasonable adjustments for those candidates with a disability or learning difficulty.

Access Arrangements allow candidates with special educational needs and disabilities to access assessments and show what they know without changing the demands of the assessment by making ‘reasonable adjustments’. They are designed to put these learners on a level playing field not at an advantage over their peers."
— JCQ Access Arrangements, Reasonable Adjustments and Special Consideration 1 Sept 2015 – 31 Aug 2016; pg 3

EAAs do not cover learners whose first language is not English; impairments are only considered regarding a learner’s first language. For further information please go to: http://www.jcq.org.uk/examination-system/access-arrangements-and-special-consideration

support at derby college

Learner Testimonials

Victoria, LIVES

Thank you for all your help. You have helped me with my confidence and helped me move on instead of feeling glum. You have helped me a lot.

Bakhtawar, LIVES

I am very grateful for the Inclusion and Support help that I have been given. It has helped me a lot this year. Whenever I come to the baseroom I always get the help I need, I feel much happier there and it helps me to get all my work done on time. I also want to say a massive thank you to the staff for helping me with everything I struggled with and was afraid of.

Bethany, FOCUS GCSE

I have exam practice and revision. I have also had help with planning and time management. I feel more confident with my English and maths.

Richard, JWC

The staff helped me organise my coursework and sorted out all my problems to do with deadlines.

Arousa, JWC

I have had support from the staff. They have helped me a lot with my work and help me revise for my exams. I would ask the support staff if I am struggling with anything.

Edward, L1 Animal Care

I think support his year at college has helped me a lot at college because I have come a long way since I have been here and gained confidence since being at college.

My support has been great at college, Support Workers have really understood the problems I have had at college and helped me to sort them out so I don’t worry about them and make them get to me or play on my mind.

Dianne, parent

Dean is really enjoying Maths I've seen a big difference in him. Thank you so much for your help, it's amazing what you've done in just an hour.
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